Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility

Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility | Phoenix, AZ, US
Phoenix North Transfer Station and Materials Recovery Facility, City of Phoenix | Phoenix, AZ, US
City of Phoenix
Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Faced with a fast-growing population, the City of Phoenix needed to quickly replace Skunk Creek Landfill, one of the city's last urban solid waste facilities. Once closed, waste would have to be shipped 60 miles and without a station to separate waste and recyclables, shipping would be cumbersome and costly. The solution was the 450-acre, $40 million North Gateway Campus that includes a 4,000 ton-per-day North Transfer Station and Material Recovery Facility. The facility has an administrative building, two scale houses, a maintenance facility, a fueling station and top-loading ports that can accommodate expansion.

To withstand Arizona's harsh heat and relentless sun, the facility was designed with a durable shell and efficient operations to conserve electricity and water. The 180,000-square-foot transfer facility separates recyclables from waste and features exterior solar lighting. Long roof overhangs shade interiors and reduce cooling needs while reflective and emissive roof paint minimizes heat radiation and improves HVAC performance. More than 90 percent of the structural steel used in the facility is recycled.

The facility was built between native desert floodplains with a minimal footprint and a profile that evokes the desert landscape. The broad ground-hugging structure blends well with neighboring mesas. Displaced native plants, including the protected saguaro cactus, were relocated to preserve the desert habitat and reduce irrigation needs.